Accession Number : AD1013603


Title :   Oman: Reform, Security, and U.S. Policy


Descriptive Note : Technical Report


Corporate Author : LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC WASHINGTON DC United States


Personal Author(s) : Katzman,Kenneth


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/1013603.pdf


Report Date : 26 Apr 2016


Pagination or Media Count : 22


Abstract : The Sultanate of Oman has been a strategic ally of the United States since 1980, when it became the first of the Persian Gulf monarchies to formally allow the U.S. military to uses bases there. The facilities access accord represented a long-term Omani shift from reliance on Britain for its security, although Oman continues to maintain close military ties to Britain. Oman has hosted U.S. forces during every U.S. military operation in and around the Gulf since then, and it is a partner in U.S. efforts to counter the transit of terrorists through regional waterways. Oman has consistently supported U.S. Middle East peacemaking efforts by publicly endorsing peace agreements reached and meeting with Israeli leaders, even when doing so ran counter to the policies of Omans Gulf state allies. It was partly in appreciation for Omans support that the United States entered into a free trade agreement (FTA) with Oman, which is also intended to help Oman diversify its economy and compensate for its lack of large reserves of crude oil. Omans ties to the United States are unlikely to loosen if its ailing leader, Sultan Qaboos bin Said Al Said, leaves the scene in the near term. He returned to Oman in March 2015 after nearly a year of treatment in Germany, but his public appearances are rare.


Descriptors :   Foreign Policy , Military assistance , GOVERNMENT (FOREIGN) , elections , national politics , foreign relations , national security , human rights , terrorism , FOREIGN MILITARY SALES , agreements


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE