Accession Number : AD1009750


Title :   A 21st Century Science, Technology, and Innovation Strategy for Americas National Security


Descriptive Note : Technical Report


Corporate Author : National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Committee on Homeland and National Security Washington United States


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/1009750.pdf


Report Date : 01 May 2016


Pagination or Media Count : 18


Abstract : I am pleased to transmit to you A 21st Century Science, Technology, and Innovation Strategy for Americas National Security (the Strategy). Led by the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Committee on Homeland and National Security, in coordination with the Office of Science and Technology Policy, this Strategy reflects input from and deliberation among the science, technology, and innovation components of the Departments and Agencies responsible for carrying out the Nations national security mission. This Strategy sets forth how the U.S. national security science, technology, and innovation enterprise should evolve to address the challenges and opportunities imposed by a new landscape of national security technology concerns in the 21st century. The Strategy is informed by the central premise of the Presidents 2015 National Security Strategy: national security involves much more than military power and homeland defense. The Strategy recognizes that the national security science, technology, and innovation enterprise includes not just the scientists and engineers working in Federal and national laboratories, but also a much larger ecosystem of academic and industry stakeholders. The Strategy acknowledges that the enterprise must continue to drive advances in science, technology, and innovation to assure that the Nations military and homeland defense remains without peer. But the enterprise also must be able to respond effectively to new challenges, such as asymmetric threats enabled by the globalization of science and technology; threats to stability, such as natural disasters and the effects of climate change; and other humanitarian and security crises, such as epidemic disease.


Descriptors :   scientific research , homeland security , national security , technology assessment , technology forecasting , threats , globalization , homeland defense , investments , technology transfer , infrastructure , policies , management , collaborative techniques , costs , military capabilities , personnel development


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE