Accession Number : AD0436491


Title :   BIOCHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF BRAIN DOPAMINE,


Corporate Author : GOTEBORG UNIV (SWEDEN)


Personal Author(s) : Carlsson,Arvid


Report Date : 08 Feb 1964


Pagination or Media Count : 13


Abstract : Dopamine is a catecholamine, formerly known as an intermediate in the formation of noradrenaline and adrenaline. Recent studies indicate that it also serves a function of its own. It occurs in particularly high concentrations in certain parts of mammalian brain, e. g. the corpus striatum. It has become possible to localize dopamine at the cellular level by means of a histochemical tech nique. Dopamine has been shown to occur in neurons and probably serves as a transmitter. Dopamine occurs in different functional systems. In the retina it appears to be involved in the control of light sensitivity, and in the median eminence in the control of anterior pituitary secretions. In the corpus striatum and certain parts of the brain stem it appears to function at a high level of integration and may play an important role in the syndromes induced by e. g. reserpine and chlorpromazine, both of which interfere with dopamine metabolism. (Author)


Descriptors :   CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM , METABOLISM , RETINA , BIOCHEMISTRY , PHARMACOLOGY , SPINAL CORD , BRAIN , FLUORESCENCE , NOREPINEPHRINE , AMINES , CHLORPROMAZINE , MENTAL DISORDERS


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE