Accession Number : AD0038485


Title :   The Influence of Practice and Pitch-Distance between Tones on the Absolute Identification of Pitch


Descriptive Note : Journal article


Corporate Author : NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH LAB NEW LONDON CT


Personal Author(s) : Hartman, E B


Full Text : https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/038485.pdf


Report Date : Mar 1954


Pagination or Media Count : 15


Abstract : The term absolute pitch customarily implies an ability to name isolated musical tones--an ability possessed by few persons. The usual experimental test of this facility requires O to identify by name (C, G sharp, F, etc.) a series of tones presented singly, each being separated from the one preceding by a designated time-interval. If O's average error of judgment satisfies a certain criterion (musical semitone or less), he is said to have absolute pitch; if his error exceeds the maximum allowed, he is not credited with absolute pitch. In the interest of extending our knowledge about the role of pitch in absolute judgments, this paper poses the following questions: How widely must a given number of pure tones be separated in pitch before the average O can make correct absolute judgments? What happens to the accuracy of absolute judgments of pitch when O is presented smaller and smaller pitch separations? How is the amount of information which O receives about the series related to the pitch-distance between tones? Are the effects of pitch-separation on absolute judgments significantly influenced by practice? How does disuse affect the ability?


Descriptors :   *PITCH DISCRIMINATION , ACCURACY , AUDIO TONES , HEARING , LEARNING , REPRINTS , TEST METHODS


Subject Categories : Psychology


Distribution Statement : APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE